Dreamcatchers – A History!

Originally created by American Indians, dreamcatchers today come in a variety of different sizes and styles. They usually consist of a small wooden hoop covered in a net or web of natural fibers, with meaningful sacred items like feathers and beads attached, hanging down from the bottom of the hoop. Real authentic, traditional dream catchers are handmade and crafted only from all natural real materials, measuring just a few small inches across in size. The hoops were usually constructed of a bent Red Willow branch covered in stretched sinews. Wrapping the frame in leather is another common finishing touch for “real” dream catchers.

History of the Dreamcatcher: Ojibwe or Lakota Origins?
Today the dreamcatcher is associated with Native American culture in general, but dream catchers are often believed to have originated from the Ojibwa Chippewa tribe. The Lakota tribe also has its own legend about the origins of the dreamcatcher, but most ethnographers believe the dreamcatchers were passed down from the Ojibwe through intermarriage and trade. The Ojibwe word for dreamcatcher asabikeshiinh actually means “spider,” referring to the web woven to loosely cover the hoop. The patterns of the dream catcher are similar to how these Native Americans tied the webbing for their snowshoes.

Ojibwa Legend & Story of the Dream catcher
Ancient legends about the history and origin of the dreamcatcher exist among several Native American tribes, chiefly the Ojibwe and Lakota nations. While many cultures find spiders to be creepy crawlers, the Ojibwe people found them to be a symbol of protection and comfort. According to the Ojibwa story, a mystical and maternal “Spider Woman” served as the spiritual protector for the tribe, especially for young children, kids and babies. As the Ojibwe continued to grow and spread out across the land, The Spider Woman found it difficult to continue to protect everyone as they traveled farther and farther away. That’s why she created the first dreamcatcher. Following her example, mothers and grandmothers would recreate the maternal keepsake as a means of protecting their children and families.

Read more at the original source: http://legomenon.com/dreamcatcher-meaning-legend-history-origins.html

About Andrew

Co-founder & lead investigator of Paranormal Encounters. I've experienced the paranormal all my life, having encountered ghosts, angels and demons. I live in a haunted house and when not exploring and researching the unknown, I enjoy single malt Scotch whisky & potato chips (though not necessarily at the same time).